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Computing

At Holy Trinity C of E Primary School, we believe that all children need to have very good IT skills if they are to succeed in the workplace. We aim to give them high quality learning experiences through access to a range of digital and electronic hardware.

 

ICT is delivered in a way that supports other learning areas as well as subject specific skills. Our ICT suite of 30 computers enables children to access a range of software packages. Each classroom also has 3 PCs, where children can practise their skills and extend their learning.

 

The introduction of the National Curriculum 2014 has seen a great change in the focus of teaching ICT in schools. Now known as Computing, there is a greater demand on children to not only use and manipulate existing programs and software, known as ‘Digital Literacy’, but also to program and develop their own games and systems that allow children to understand the beginnings of computer science.

 

We recognise that the world of technology is fast changing. Education needs to progress, in order that children move forward with the skills and knowledge necessary to be active participants in a digital world. The aims of the National Curriculum 2014 are summarised below:

 

Aims to ensure all pupils:

  • can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation;
  • can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems;
  • can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems;
  • are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology.

 

We have adopted a scheme of work called iCompute. This is a comprehensive package with aims in line with the new curriculum.  It supports teachers in delivering high quality lessons, allowing children to develop skills such as coding, debugging and programming. Alongside this, teachers use Schemes of Work, developed by QCA and adapted to suit our children’s needs, to help embed the new curriculum.

 

Throughout the curriculum, children are taught about the different purposes of using the Internet, for example for communicating, finding out information, or for sharing files. Each child has their own folder where they can save and retrieve their work.

 

E-safety is an important aspect of using the online world, and children are taught about how to keep themselves safe, building an awareness of the potential risks at an age-appropriate level.

 

Resources

To deliver the demands of the new curriculum, we are equipped with a range of resources and hardware to best support teaching and learning in this area. Each class has 3 computers, enabling computer access at a variety of levels, be it small group work, independent access to further learning in a particular area, or through whole class teaching sessions.

 

There is a wide range of software suitable for young children, which aims to develop a broad range of ICT skills, and to support learning in other areas of the curriculum. Children are also given opportunities to use various forms of hardware to support learning, for example digital cameras, Learnpads, sound recorders, CD players and programmable toys. Every classroom is equipped with an interactive whiteboard and sound system.

 

We have a networked ICT Suite that houses 30 computers and a teaching computer that can gain access to the other computers to enable the children to see what the teacher is doing on the screen in front of them. The Suite is timetabled effectively throughout the week, across the year groups, to help support learning across the curriculum, as well as providing the opportunity for teachers to teach specific IT skills.

 

Each child has their own ICT folder, available through the networked system, on any computer within the school. These folders are set up in Early Years and move with the children, onto their next year group, when appropriate. Children in Year 1 and 2 are taught how to save to their individual file, retrieve and edit their previous work, when required.

ICT is widely used by teachers and teaching assistants within the school to support and enrich learning. The use of interactive whiteboards in the classrooms, allows children to interact with technology, in a variety of ways, and also supports whole class learning.

 

Key Stage 1

The content of the Computer curriculum for Key Stage 1 has been divided into three different strands.

Computer Area

Learning Objective

Computer Science

  • understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions
  • create and debug simple programs
  • use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs

Information Technology

  • use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content

Digital Literacy

  • recognise common uses of information technology beyond school
  • use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.

These strands are not taught in isolation, but taught throughout the year, as appropriate, and in a cross-curricular way to develop the key skills. Due to the large changes in the National Curriculum for Computing, the skills covered in Computing Science will be introduced throughout 2014 and onwards.

 

Key Stage 2

The content of the Computing curriculum for Key Stage 2 has been divided into three different strands.

Computer Area

Learning Objective

Computer Science

  • design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts
  • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output
  • use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  • understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration

Information Technology

  • select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programmes, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information

Digital Literacy

  • use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content

These strands are not taught in isolation, but taught throughout the year, as appropriate, and in a cross-curricular way to develop the key skills. Due to the large changes in the National Curriculum for Computing, the skills covered in Computing Science will be introduced throughout 2014 and onwards.

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